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webmaster is Chuck Filteau

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Please note:
I have not used hyphens between given names (Jean Baptiste is given instead of Jean-Baptiste).
I have also stayed away from using the accented characters (Therese is recorded instead of Thérèse)

My goal is to eventually link all persons who are related (but not yet linked) to our family tree. That includes any and all Filteau - Fecteau - Facteau - Felteau - Feilteau (and any other variation) persons. In addition, I would like to add any and all persons who are in-laws to a "Filteau" person.
    Please contact us with any corrections or additions
, especially if you can provide the names for the parents of an unlinked person; or you can provide the names of anyone who should be a member of this extended family, but is not listed in this database.

The Filteau - Fecteau - Facteau families in North America

Pierre Filteau and Gillette Savard (who had immigrated from France) were married in the great Basilica of Notre Dame in Quebec City in 1666.
    Pierre and Gillette had 14 children, but only seven of them (five sons and two daughters lived to marry). I have not been able to discover any children of Joseph and Marie de Rainville. Therefore it was only these four: Nicolas, Gabriel, Pierre, and Jean Baptiste who became our forefathers in North America.

The book Dictionnaire Genealogique de la Famille Filteau, written by the genealogist L. H. Filteau, contains an appendix in which the author prints the correspondence he had with the civil and religious authorities in France. Unfortunately, those letters tell us the town records, for the cities that Pierre and Gillette lived in, were destroyed during the French Revolution. Through the courtesy of www.archive.org a copy of that book is available on this web site as a searchable PDF. You can browse or download a copy of it to your own computer for your own family reference.

Over the years, the name was phonetically spelled in a variety of ways, but the most common spellings today are Filteau, Fecteau, and Facteau.
    In the United States, where people often did not understand the French language, the name usually became Fecto or Facto.
    The spelling of Fecto seems to be more common in the state of New York.
    The spelling of Facto seems to be more common in the settlers of the Missouri River valley around St. Louis.
    I have encountered about 90 variations in books, government documents, and census records.

I have been researching the various Filteau family tree members for more than 25 years (when I started searching for my own ancestry). This database now has the names of more than 102,000 persons who are blood related or are already connected to the family by marriage. There are also some "loose ends" that should be connected but their exact parentage is unknown to me.
    I have scoured books, all the census records in Canada (1851-1921), all the census records in the USA (including the states' census for the x5 years) (my special thanks to Ancestry.com for its full indexing), online obituaries, e-mails from various family members when helping them in their research, and hundreds of web sites to discover the names and relationships of the people in this database.
    Ancestry.com has just released an index to the 1891 census for Canada so I will begin adding that data as I find time to do the research.

   I recently discovered a link to the census records of Acadie from 1671 to 1763 - I have not yet linked the names in this database to these records at:  http://www2.umoncton.ca/cfdocs/cea/livres/doc.cfm?ident=R0231&cform=T


The names of all persons, living or dead, have come from publicly available documents or have been given to me by family members. However, I will remove the factual data for any living person upon request.

So, what you find here is from a huge variety of sources (almost all of them fully documented).
    However, I must have a dislaimer that says I cannot fully guarantee the accuracy of the data. For example, I know I must have made a few errors in transcribing original data into my own gedcoms (e.g, a date may be wrong). I apologize for those accidental errors. Perhaps, in some cases, the original source for my data was incorrect. Unfortunately, until you contact us and tell us what is wrong and tell us how to correct it, it will remain "as is" in this database.
   
(*) is used as a tag in the prefix for anyone who is one of my ancestors.
(#) is used as a tag in the prefix for anyone who is one of my wife's ancestors who are from Acadia or Quebec.



If you find your name here, or the names of your parents or grandparents, please register.
    REGISTRATION, after approval, can allow you to see factual information for your living cousins.

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This page was last updated on 26 Jul 2015